SPM 09-19-2018: Hot Temperatures Continue

Issue Date: Wednesday, September 19th, 2018
Issue Time: 10:10 AM MDT

Summary:

Tuesday was another day with dry conditions and hot temperatures. High temperatures at the lower elevations reached the 90F mark once again with Lamar reaching 100F. The jet sagged southward and promoted some decent surface winds over the Northwest Slope. A Red Flag Warning was issued at 10AM through the evening hours as conditions promoted critical fire weather. Thankfully no new fires were started as crews have their hands full with the Ryan and Silver Creek fires. Some fair weather cumulus popped up in the afternoon hours, which helped provide a little shade form the heat. With very dry low-levels in the atmosphere, there was no rainfall recorded in Colorado yesterday.

Once again, nothing to see on the State Precipitation Map below.

Click Here For Map Overview

The map below shows radar-estimated, rainfall gage-adjusted Quantitative Precipitation Estimates (QPE) across Colorado. The map is updated daily during the operational season (May 1 – Sep 30) by 11AM. The following six layers are currently available: 24-hour, 48-hour and 72-hour total precipitation, as well as maximum 1-hour, 2-hour and 6-hour precipitation over the past 24 hour period (to estimate where flash flooding may have occurred). The 24-hour, 48-hour and 72-hour total precipitation contain bias corrections that are not disaggregated into the hourly estimates, so there will likely be some differences. The accumulation ending time is 7AM of the date shown in the bottom right corner. Also shown optionally are fire burn areas (post 2012), which are updated throughout the season to include new burn areas. The home button in the top left corner resets the map to the original zoom.

SPM 09-18-2018: The Heat Streak Continues

Issue Date: Tuesday, September 18th, 2018
Issue Time: 09:00 AM MDT

Summary:

Another repetitive SPM post as little changed in the upper-level pattern yesterday. Temperatures reached 90F at the lower elevations again, so that can be added to the tally of 90F+ days for the season. Some mid-level moisture streamed in with a shortwave, which helped provide some afternoon cloud cover and a few light showers over the northern high terrains. Trace amounts of rainfall and totals up to 0.05 inches were reported over the Northern Mountains and Front Range. A 60 mph wind gust was reported in Moffat County near Craig from a thunderstorm, which was likely not helpful for firefighters. There were also some light showers associated with the shortwave as it moved along the CO/WY border. Totals up to 0.25 inches were reported over Sedgwick County. It will only be a couple more days before fall starts and some fall-like temperatures make it into the forecast. I think everyone will welcome the break from the heat and dry at this point. It will also help fight the 10 fires burning across the state, especially the Ryan and Silver Creek Fires.

Once again, nothing to see on the State Precipitation Map below.

Click Here For Map Overview

The map below shows radar-estimated, rainfall gage-adjusted Quantitative Precipitation Estimates (QPE) across Colorado. The map is updated daily during the operational season (May 1 – Sep 30) by 11AM. The following six layers are currently available: 24-hour, 48-hour and 72-hour total precipitation, as well as maximum 1-hour, 2-hour and 6-hour precipitation over the past 24 hour period (to estimate where flash flooding may have occurred). The 24-hour, 48-hour and 72-hour total precipitation contain bias corrections that are not disaggregated into the hourly estimates, so there will likely be some differences. The accumulation ending time is 7AM of the date shown in the bottom right corner. Also shown optionally are fire burn areas (post 2012), which are updated throughout the season to include new burn areas. The home button in the top left corner resets the map to the original zoom.

SPM 09-17-2018: Rounding Out the Weekend with yet another Hot, Dry Day

Issue Date: Monday, September 17th, 2018
Issue Time: 09:10 AM MDT

Summary:

I guess you can say that we’re still in the dog days of summer with the multiple days of 90F+ heat. It’s hard to believe that fall is beginning at the end of this week. A bit more mid-level moisture streamed into the state yesterday, which helped bring some increased cloud cover and welcomed shade from the heat. With such dry low-levels in the atmosphere, only trace amounts of rain (sprinkles, really) reached the surface in a very patch pattern. However, the increased moisture did bring some relief to fire weather in western and north-central Colorado. Red Flag Warning criteria was not quite met, which helped fight the ongoing fires. Northwest Colorado is currently fighting five wildfires: Ryan Fire (Routt County), Silver Creek Fire (Grand County), Cache Creek Fire (Garfield County), Boone Draw and Three Wash Fires (Moffat County).

With ongoing dry conditions, not too much to see on the State Precipitation Map below.

Click Here For Map Overview

The map below shows radar-estimated, rainfall gage-adjusted Quantitative Precipitation Estimates (QPE) across Colorado. The map is updated daily during the operational season (May 1 – Sep 30) by 11AM. The following six layers are currently available: 24-hour, 48-hour and 72-hour total precipitation, as well as maximum 1-hour, 2-hour and 6-hour precipitation over the past 24 hour period (to estimate where flash flooding may have occurred). The 24-hour, 48-hour and 72-hour total precipitation contain bias corrections that are not disaggregated into the hourly estimates, so there will likely be some differences. The accumulation ending time is 7AM of the date shown in the bottom right corner. Also shown optionally are fire burn areas (post 2012), which are updated throughout the season to include new burn areas. The home button in the top left corner resets the map to the original zoom.

SPM 09-16-2018: Broken Record of Heat

Issue Date: Sunday, September 16th, 2018
Issue Time: 9:30 AM MDT

Summary:

If it feels like you have been reading similar State Precipitation Map discussions for a few days now, that’s because you have. Due to the strong, high pressure ridge still in place across Colorado, the weather yesterday was marked by abundant sunshine and near-record high temperatures. Low relative humidity values and gusty winds brought Red Flag conditions to portions of northwest Colorado again yesterday, promoting ideal conditions for the new “Boone Draw” fire in Moffat County to continue to grow. It is now at 8,079 acres and 5% containment.

No flash flooding was reported yesterday. For a look at precipitation estimates in your area, please see the State Precipitation Map below.

Click Here For Map Overview

The map below shows radar-estimated, rainfall gage-adjusted Quantitative Precipitation Estimates (QPE) across Colorado. The map is updated daily during the operational season (May 1 – Sep 30) by 11AM. The following six layers are currently available: 24-hour, 48-hour and 72-hour total precipitation, as well as maximum 1-hour, 2-hour and 6-hour precipitation over the past 24 hour period (to estimate where flash flooding may have occurred). The 24-hour, 48-hour and 72-hour total precipitation contain bias corrections that are not disaggregated into the hourly estimates, so there will likely be some differences. The accumulation ending time is 7AM of the date shown in the bottom right corner. Also shown optionally are fire burn areas (post 2012), which are updated throughout the season to include new burn areas. The home button in the top left corner resets the map to the original zoom.