SPM 09-26-2019: Light Rainfall for El Paso County and Increase in Drought Area for Colorado

Issue Date: Thursday, September 26th, 2019
Issue Time: 9:45AM MDT

Summary:

Once again, another gorgeous fall day with some very impressive high temperatures for late September. Below are the 24-hour maximum high temperatures across the state from the NWS ASOS network (source: MesoWest). The only place that recorded rainfall was El Paso County. Very light rainfall fell between 10 and 11PM last night with totals around or under 0.05 inches. Otherwise it was a rain-free day across the state.

The newest drought map was released this morning. Quite the change from the last map with an increase in drought area (D0-D4) of 16%. The D1 category increased about 4% and is now just shy of 11% of the cumulative area of Colorado. Eastern Gunnison, Chaffee, Pitkin, and Lake County are also included in the D1 category now with the D1 category drifting further north over the western border (into Montrose and Mesa County).

To see estimated precipitation totals over your neighborhood the last 72-hours, scroll down to the State Precipitation Map below.

 

Click Here For Map Overview

The map below shows radar-estimated, rainfall gage-adjusted Quantitative Precipitation Estimates (QPE) across Colorado. The map is updated daily during the operational season (May 1 – Sep 30) by 11AM. The following six layers are currently available: 24-hour, 48-hour and 72-hour total precipitation, as well as maximum 1-hour, 2-hour and 6-hour precipitation over the past 24 hour period (to estimate where flash flooding may have occurred). The 24-hour, 48-hour and 72-hour total precipitation contain bias corrections that are not disaggregated into the hourly estimates, so there will likely be some differences. The accumulation ending time is 7AM of the date shown in the bottom right corner. Also shown optionally are vulnerable fire burn areas (post 2012), which are updated throughout the season to include new, vulnerable burn areas. The home button in the top left corner resets the map to the original zoom.

SPM 09-25-2019: Clear Conditions and Above Average Temperatures

Issue Date: Wednesday, September 25th, 2019
Issue Time: 9:25AM MDT

Summary:

Another beautiful day on Tuesday with the dry air mass overhead keeping the rain threat away. There was some very light rainfall reported over the Southeast Plains for the 24-hour period, but totals were under 0.05 inches (from yesterday morning). Below is a visible satellite imagery from 3PM MDT yesterday. Outside of a couple high cloud over the NE/CO/WY border and far Southeast Plains, only a couple fair weather cumulus were present over the southern mountains. Everywhere else expected a severe clear day with temperatures in the 90°Fs over the eastern plains, 80°Fs over the Urban Corridors, and 70°Fs in the mountain valleys. Temperatures dipped into the mid-40°Fs over the eastern plains overnight, so quite the diurnal temperature swing (High – Low > 40°F+). These large swings are not uncommon for this time of year.


To see estimated precipitation totals over your area the last couple of days, scroll down to the State Precipitation Map below.

Click Here For Map Overview

The map below shows radar-estimated, rainfall gage-adjusted Quantitative Precipitation Estimates (QPE) across Colorado. The map is updated daily during the operational season (May 1 – Sep 30) by 11AM. The following six layers are currently available: 24-hour, 48-hour and 72-hour total precipitation, as well as maximum 1-hour, 2-hour and 6-hour precipitation over the past 24 hour period (to estimate where flash flooding may have occurred). The 24-hour, 48-hour and 72-hour total precipitation contain bias corrections that are not disaggregated into the hourly estimates, so there will likely be some differences. The accumulation ending time is 7AM of the date shown in the bottom right corner. Also shown optionally are vulnerable fire burn areas (post 2012), which are updated throughout the season to include new, vulnerable burn areas. The home button in the top left corner resets the map to the original zoom.

SPM 09-24-2019: Light Rainfall for the Southern Border

Issue Date: Tuesday, September 24th, 2019
Issue Time: 10:10AM MDT

Summary:

Late afternoon/early evening showers for the southern border as a shortwave moved through the southwest flow aloft. A slight increase in PW values allowed rainfall to reach the surface. It was too dry at the low levels to have any accumulation further north. Durango recorded 0.23 inches at the NWS ASOS site (KDRO) with Animas River (near Cedar Hill, NM) recording 0.28 inches at a USGS gage. Storms spread eastward throughout the evening, so the San Luis Valley also got some measurable rain. Radar indicates as much as 0.25 inches over the northeast corner of the valley with widespread totals between 0.05 and 0.15 inches. Light rain also fell over the Southeast Mountains and adjacent Southeast Plains, but totals were under 0.10 inches.

Flooding was not reported yesterday. To see estimated precipitation totals over your area the last 72-hours, scroll down to the State Precipitation Map below.

Click Here For Map Overview

The map below shows radar-estimated, rainfall gage-adjusted Quantitative Precipitation Estimates (QPE) across Colorado. The map is updated daily during the operational season (May 1 – Sep 30) by 11AM. The following six layers are currently available: 24-hour, 48-hour and 72-hour total precipitation, as well as maximum 1-hour, 2-hour and 6-hour precipitation over the past 24 hour period (to estimate where flash flooding may have occurred). The 24-hour, 48-hour and 72-hour total precipitation contain bias corrections that are not disaggregated into the hourly estimates, so there will likely be some differences. The accumulation ending time is 7AM of the date shown in the bottom right corner. Also shown optionally are vulnerable fire burn areas (post 2012), which are updated throughout the season to include new, vulnerable burn areas. The home button in the top left corner resets the map to the original zoom.

SPM 09-23-2019: Clear Day & a Leaf Peeping Outlook for Fall 2019

Issue Date: Monday, September 23rd, 2019
Issue Time: 9:40AM MDT

Summary:

Rain-free day for the state on Sunday as high pressure began to build over the state and a drier air mass moved overhead. PW dropped off as much as 0.3 inches over the Northeast Plains after overnight rainfall on Saturday. Below are overnight low temperatures from the RAWS network (source: MesoWest). Not quite as cool as Saturday night, but still some chilly temperatures to wake up to. High temperatures on Sunday were actually 5-8°F warmer than Saturday minus small areas over of the northern Northeast Plains and central Southeast Plains. The largest warm up was over the Front Range and Southeast Mountains. Overall, calm with clear skies, so hopefully you were able to get out and enjoy the weather.

Autumn colors are expected to peak around the usual time (early to mid) October. I may lean a little closer towards mid-October due to the above average temperatures, especially in regards to overnight lows. According to the map below (produced by the Smoky Mountains website) there is already partial peaking occurring for most of the high terrains. An above average year (colors) is predicted due to the wet spring and heavy snowfall last winter. It will be interesting to see how the dry conditions over the last couple of months affect the colors over western Colorado. You can follow along here for conditions around the lower 48 states: https://smokymountains.com/fall-foliage-map


To see estimated precipitation totals over your area the last 72-hours, scroll down to the State Precipitation Map below.

Click Here For Map Overview

The map below shows radar-estimated, rainfall gage-adjusted Quantitative Precipitation Estimates (QPE) across Colorado. The map is updated daily during the operational season (May 1 – Sep 30) by 11AM. The following six layers are currently available: 24-hour, 48-hour and 72-hour total precipitation, as well as maximum 1-hour, 2-hour and 6-hour precipitation over the past 24 hour period (to estimate where flash flooding may have occurred). The accumulation ending time is 7AM of the date shown in the bottom right corner. Also shown optionally are vulnerable fire burn areas (post 2012), which are updated throughout the season to include new, vulnerable burn areas. The home button in the top left corner resets the map to the original zoom.

Note: The 24-hour, 48-hour and 72-hour total precipitation do not contain bias corrections today due to errors in the CoCoRaHS data. This means there may be underestimations in QPE over the southwest and southeast corners of the state.