SPM 08-12-2022: Storms for Western Colorado, More Dry Weather for the East

Issue Date: Friday, August 12th, 2022
Issue Time: 10:45 AM MDT

Summary:

The western half of the state saw some relief from the dry weather on Thursday, with rainfall across the southwest slope up to the Front Range. There were several Flood Advisories issued across the western slope; locations include on and near Black Canyon of the Gunnison National Park, northeast of Telluride, and also over a portion of the Pine Gulch burn scar. 0.5” hail and high winds of 40-50 mph were reported associated with the flood advisory in the National Park – a CoCoRaHS reporter in Montrose nearby reported similar. Near Grand Junction, high winds of up to 47 mph were reported, and nearby in Palisade saw 0.43”.

Flood Advisories were also issued for parts of the Cameron Peak and East Troublesome burn scars yesterday afternoon – via CoCoRaHS, Lake Granby near East Troublesome received up to 0.26”. However, no flooding in either of these locations was reported.

Moving east, the Northwest Slope saw some rainfall as well, including 0.57” and 0.39” in Yampa and Phippsburg. There were also high winds of up to 52 mph reported in Craig.

Lastly, precipitation in the southwest quadrant of the state ranged from trace amounts to 0.19”, with notable amounts of 0.28” in Rico an 0.44” in Cahone. The Urban Corridor and Eastern Plains continued to stay precipitation-free.

There was no flooding reported yesterday.

If you observe flooding in your area, remember to use the “Report a Flood” page to make any flood reports when you can safely do so. For precipitation estimates in our area, check out the map below.

Click Here For Map Overview

The map below shows radar-estimated, rainfall gage-adjusted Quantitative Precipitation Estimates (QPE) across Colorado. The map is updated daily during the operational season (May 1 – Sep 30) by 11AM. The following six layers are currently available: 24-hour, 48-hour and 72-hour total precipitation, as well as maximum 1-hour, 2-hour and 6-hour precipitation over the past 24 hour period (to estimate where flash flooding may have occurred). The accumulation ending time is 7AM of the date shown in the bottom right corner. Also shown optionally are vulnerable fire burn areas (post 2012), which are updated throughout the season to include new, vulnerable burn areas. The home button in the top left corner resets the map to the original zoom.

SPM 08-11-2022: Dry Weather Continues

Issue Date: Thursday, August 11th, 2022
Issue Time: 10:15 AM MDT

Summary:

Rainfall seemed to continue the trend from yesterday. The eastern half of the state saw no precipitation outside of a few reports of under 0.1” around the Urban Corridor. The west was a little more active, although most areas still received less than 0.15” if they received any precipitation. A severe thunderstorm warning was issued from 4:30 pm – 5 pm over the Colorado-Utah border east of Moab, but no flooding or severe weather was reported. This area received 0.12” according to a Mesowest gage, and Grand Junction to the north saw up to almost 0.1”. Areas where precipitation observations stayed below about 0.1” include Durango, Placerville, Gypsum, and El Jebel.

0.38” near Dolores, 0.39” northwest of Rifle, and 0.24” north of Minturn were among the highest totals for Colorado yesterday. There was a Flood Advisory issued north of Eagle, from 6:36 pm – 9:45 pm, but no flooding was reported.

The newest U.S. Drought Monitor update was released, shown as the image below. Due to the weekend’s significant rainfall, there was a decrease of land in most of the drought categories, from “None” to “Severe”. The percentage of area with no drought increased from 3.27% to 8.24%! The Abnormally Dry category decreased from 96.73% to 91.76%, and there were also decreases in the Moderate and Severe drought categories by approximately 4% – welcome improvements to conditions across Colorado.


There was no flooding reported yesterday.

If you observe flooding in your area, remember to use the “Report a Flood” page to make any flood reports when you can safely do so. For precipitation estimates in our area, check out the map below.

Click Here For Map Overview

The map below shows radar-estimated, rainfall gage-adjusted Quantitative Precipitation Estimates (QPE) across Colorado. The map is updated daily during the operational season (May 1 – Sep 30) by 11AM. The following six layers are currently available: 24-hour, 48-hour and 72-hour total precipitation, as well as maximum 1-hour, 2-hour and 6-hour precipitation over the past 24 hour period (to estimate where flash flooding may have occurred). The accumulation ending time is 7AM of the date shown in the bottom right corner. Also shown optionally are vulnerable fire burn areas (post 2012), which are updated throughout the season to include new, vulnerable burn areas. The home button in the top left corner resets the map to the original zoom.

SPM 08-10-2022: Calm, Dry Tuesday

Issue Date: Wednesday, August 10th, 2022
Issue Time: 9:30 AM MDT

Summary:

Yesterday was quite calm across the state. The only rainfall across Colorado was in the south, from the Southeast Mountains over to the western border on the Southwest Slope. Most observations in this region were trace – 0.1”, but some higher totals include 0.28” in Alamosa, 0.14” near Chromo, 0.24” near Mancos, and 0. 42” northwest of Durango. The precipitation was reported as a result of afternoon and evening storms, via CoCoRaHS observations.

No flooding or severe weather was reported yesterday.

If you observe flooding in your area, remember to use the “Report a Flood” page to make any flood reports when you can safely do so. For precipitation estimates in our area, check out the map below.

Click Here For Map Overview

The map below shows radar-estimated, rainfall gage-adjusted Quantitative Precipitation Estimates (QPE) across Colorado. The map is updated daily during the operational season (May 1 – Sep 30) by 11AM. The following six layers are currently available: 24-hour, 48-hour and 72-hour total precipitation, as well as maximum 1-hour, 2-hour and 6-hour precipitation over the past 24 hour period (to estimate where flash flooding may have occurred). The accumulation ending time is 7AM of the date shown in the bottom right corner. Also shown optionally are vulnerable fire burn areas (post 2012), which are updated throughout the season to include new, vulnerable burn areas. The home button in the top left corner resets the map to the original zoom.

SPM 08-09-2022: Storms for Southern High Terrain

Issue Date: Tuesday, August 9th, 2022
Issue Time: 9:00 AM MDT

Summary:

Monday saw relatively quieter weather compared to Sunday’s widespread heavy rainfall and flooding. Isolated to widely scattered showers and storms developed with daytime heating by mid-afternoon across mainly the southern half of the state, with storms remaining confined to the high terrain.

The heaviest rain was observed across the far southern Front Range, and southwestward and southeastward from there across the southern mountains and foothills. QPE data indicates amounts were generally in the 0.5”-1.5” range, with notable observations of 0.95” west of La Veta and 0.58” north of Pagosa Springs from automated gauges. Several Flash Flood Warnings were issued along the southern I-25 corridor, although no flooding was reported. One of the warnings was for portions of northeast Fremont/southwest Teller Counties west of Colorado Springs, with a CoCoRaHS observer reporting 0.72” of rain and hail up to 0.5” near Cripple Creek. The other two warnings were issued for north central Custer County and for the Spring Creek burn scar.

For the northern half of the state, the only noteworthy precipitation was from isolated cells that tracked into eastern Weld County, prompting a Severe Thunderstorm Warning; no reports of severe weather were received. Rain gauge coverage is sparse, but QPE data suggests a narrow swath of up to 1.5” of rain from eastern Weld into northwestern Morgan Counties.

If you observe flooding in your area, remember to use the “Report a Flood” page to make any flood reports when you can safely do so. For precipitation estimates in our area, check out the map below.

Click Here For Map Overview

The map below shows radar-estimated, rainfall gage-adjusted Quantitative Precipitation Estimates (QPE) across Colorado. The map is updated daily during the operational season (May 1 – Sep 30) by 11AM. The following six layers are currently available: 24-hour, 48-hour and 72-hour total precipitation, as well as maximum 1-hour, 2-hour and 6-hour precipitation over the past 24 hour period (to estimate where flash flooding may have occurred). The accumulation ending time is 7AM of the date shown in the bottom right corner. Also shown optionally are vulnerable fire burn areas (post 2012), which are updated throughout the season to include new, vulnerable burn areas. The home button in the top left corner resets the map to the original zoom.